11 Things: 11 Books to read before graduating college

0

By Annika Tomlin

#11 “HAMLET” BY SHAKESPEARE

One of Shakespeare’s most renowned plays, the drama and heartbreak is still relevant. Everyone should read at least one of Shakespeare’s works prior to graduation, whether it’s in an English class or on your own, to send people’s creative minds on a trip.

#10 “THE IDIOT” BY ELIF BATUMAN

The title is a little deceiving. This is a feel-good story about a girl from Turkish immigrant parents who is starting her freshman year at Harvard and what that means for her when she meets new people and falls in love. “The Idiot” is a great book for incoming freshmen to read as a way to hear about some of the ups and downs they might face during their first year in college.

#9 “BRAVE NEW WORLD” BY ALDOUS HUXLEY

This book is seen as a perfect-world utopia or a horrible dystopia, depending on a person’s point of view. It’s a good reminder that the world is always changing and that it is good to be prepared regardless of what happens in the future. This highly regarded piece is one of the most banned books in the world.

#8 “THE GREAT GATSBY” BY F. SCOTT FITZGERALD

“The Great Gatsby” is in a world of its own. This classic novel dives into the money struggle of the 1920s and how it changed everyone’s way of life. Through greed and power, readers are reminded that not everything is always what it looks like on the outside.

#7 “THE ART OF HAPPINESS” BY THE 14TH DALAI LAMA AND HOWARD CULTER

Psychiatrist Howard Culter interviewed the current Dalai Lama, who discusses how he lives a happy life. This book outlines how to live a happy life or improve your own life.

#6 “YOU LEARN BY LIVING” BY ELEANOR ROOSEVELT

Former First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt went through several bits of turbulence during her lifetime, but she always had a smile on her face. Her book “You Learn by Living: Eleven Keys for a More Fulfilling Life” illustrates her philosophy of life by referencing her personal experiences and how she coped with them while adhering to her personal and public responsibilities.

#5 “HOW TO STOP FEELING LIKE SH*T” BY ANDREA OWEN

This book serves as a women’s guide to living a happy and successful life. Author Andrea Owen breaks down why women have undermining habits and how they can break them. Each short chapter is nicely digestible while getting right to the point.

#4 “HOW TO WIN FRIENDS AND INFLUENCE PEOPLE” BY DALE CARNEGIE

Originally published in 1936, the book still helps readers move up the ladder of success. Within these pages, readers can explore the six ways to make people like you, the 12 ways to win people over and the nine ways to change people without arousing resentment. Bonus tip: A newer version of the book tackles the digital age.

#3 “ADULTING: HOW TO BECOME A GROWN-UP IN 535 EASY(ISH) STEPS” BY KELLY WILLIAMS BROWN

These 535 tips help young adults learn to combat adulthood. Just because you might not feel like an adult all the time, that doesn’t mean that you are incapable of acting like one. Read about renting an apartment and avoiding the work hookup, among other topics.

#2 “MAKE YOUR BED” BY ADM. WILLIAM H. MCRAVEN

“If you want to change the world, start off by making your bed.” Admiral William H. McRaven told the 2014 University of Texas at Austin graduating class. Building on the core lessons he touched on in his speech, this book dives further into personal tales of his military service and how he made tough decisions with determination, compassion, honor and courage.

#1 “THE SUBTLE ART OF NOT GIVING A F*CK” BY MARK MANSON

This book is exactly what you might think based on the title. Mark Manson humorously writes about how positive thinking is a load of garbage (but he uses more colorful language). This book is for someone who wants to build a thicker skin. CT

Share.

Comments are closed.